The Diversified Blog

A wealth management blog dedicated to creating a long lasting sustainable retirement.

Starting Out: Begin Funding for Your Financial Security

Congratulations! You’ve graduated from school and landed a job. Your salary, however, is limited, and you don't have much money (if any) left at the end of the month. So where can you find money to save? And, once you find it, where should this cash go?

Here are some ways to help free up the money you need for current expenses, financial protection, and future investments -- all without pushing the panic button.

Get Out From Under

For most young adults, paying down debt is the first step toward freeing up cash for the financial protection they need. If you’re spending more than you make, think about areas where you can cut back. Don't rule out getting a less expensive apartment, roommates, or trading in a more expensive car for a secondhand model. Other expenses that could be trimmed include dining out, entertainment, and vacations.

If you owe balances on high-rate credit cards, look into obtaining a low-interest credit card or bank loan and transferring your existing balances. Then plan to pay as much as you can each month to reduce the total balance, and try to avoid adding new charges.

If you have student loans, there's also help to make paying them back easier. You may be eligible to reduce these payments if you qualify for the Federal Direct Consolidation Loan program. Though the program would lengthen the payment time somewhat, it could also free up extra cash each month to apply to your higher-interest consumer debt. The program can be reached at 800-557-7392.

What You Really Should Buy

How would you pay the bills if your paychecks suddenly stopped? That's when you turn to insurance and personal savings -- two items you should “buy” before considering future big-ticket purchases.

Health insurance is your first priority. Health care insurance is now also mandatory under the Affordable Care Act. If you're not covered under an employer plan, look into the new state or national health insurance exchanges, which offer a variety of coverage options and providers to choose from. You may also qualify for a subsidy if your taxable income is under 400% of the federal poverty level.

Life insurance is the next logical step, but may only be a concern if you have dependents.

Disability insurance should be another consideration. In fact, government statistics estimate that just over 25% of today's 20-year-olds will become disabled before they retire. 1  Disability insurance will replace a portion of your income if you can't work for an extended period due to illness or injury. If you can't get this through your employer, call individual insurance companies to compare rates.

Build a Cash Reserve

If you should ever become disabled or lose your job, you'll also need savings to fall back on until paychecks start up again. Try to save at least three months' worth of living expenses in an easy-to- access "liquid" account, which includes a checking or savings account. Saving up emergency cash is easier if your financial institution has an automatic payroll savings plan. These plans automatically transfer a designated amount of your salary each pay period -- before you see your paycheck -- directly into your account.

To get the best rate on your liquid savings, look into putting part of this nest egg into money market funds. Money market funds invest in Treasury bills, short-term corporate loans, and other low-risk instruments that typically pay higher returns than savings accounts. These funds strive to maintain a stable $1 per share value, but unlike FDIC-insured bank accounts, can't guarantee they won't lose money. 2

Some money market funds may require a minimum initial investment of $1,000 or more. If so, you'll need to build some savings first. Once you do, you can get an idea of what the top-earning money market funds are paying by referring to iMoneyNet, which publishes current yields. Many newspapers also publish yields on a regular basis.


Build Your Financial Future

Some long-term financial opportunities are too good to put off, even if you are still building a cache for current living expenses.

One of the best deals is an employer-sponsored retirement plan such as a 401(k) plan, if available. These tax-advantaged plans allow you to make pretax contributions, and taxes aren't owed on any earnings until they're withdrawn. What's more, new Roth-style plans allow for after-tax contributions and tax-free withdrawals in retirement, provided certain eligibility requirements are met. Another big plus is direct contributions from each paycheck so you won't miss the money as well as possible employer matches on a portion of your contributions.

Don't underestimate the potential power of tax savings. If you invested $100 per month into one of these accounts and it earned an 8% return compounded annually, you would have $146,815 in 30 years -- nearly $50,000 more than if the money were taxed annually at 25%. 3 Bear in mind, however, that you will have to pay taxes on the retirement plan savings when you take withdrawals. If you took a lump-sum withdrawal and paid a 25% tax rate, you'd have $110,111, which is still more than the balance you'd have in a taxable account.

If you're already participating, think about either increasing contributions now or with each raise and promotion.

If a 401(k) isn't available to you, shop around for individual retirement accounts (IRAs), both traditional and Roth, at banks or mutual fund firms. In 2016, you can contribute up to $5,500 to traditional IRAs or Roth IRAs. Generally, contributions to and income earned on traditional IRAs are tax deferred until retirement; Roth IRA contributions are made after taxes, but earnings thereon can be withdrawn tax free upon retirement. Note that certain eligibility requirements apply and nonqualified taxable withdrawals made before age 59½ are subject to a 10% additional federal tax.

Stop Waiting for the Next Paycheck

Beginning your working life with good financial decisions doesn't call for complex moves. It does require discipline and a long-term outlook. This commitment can help get you out of debt and keep you from a paycheck-to- paycheck lifestyle.


Source(s):

1.  Social Security Administration, Fact Sheet, March 2014.

2.  An investment in a money market fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although the fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1.00 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund.

3.  This hypothetical example is for illustrative purposes only. It does not represent the performance of any actual investment.


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© 2017 DST Systems, Inc. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited, except by permission. All rights reserved. Not responsible for any errors or omissions.


Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

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Things You Should Never Buy at Aldi

Here is a nice article provided by Bob Niedt of Kiplinger:


Haven’t shopped at an Aldi supermarket yet? That could change soon. The German chain, famous for its no frills and low prices, is in the midst of a boom. After steadily expanding its footprint in the eastern part of the country over the past 40 years – the first U.S. store opened in Iowa in 1976 – Aldi is now adding locations in Southern California. By 2018, the company expects to have close to 2,000 stores nationwide, up from fewer than 1,600 today.

If you’re new to Aldi’s minimalist approach to grocery shopping, you’re in for a shocker. You pay a refundable quarter to rent a cart. You bag your own groceries. Oh, and you’ll even need to pay for those bags unless you bring your own. There are few shelves, few employees and none of the amenities you’ve come to expect from the likes of Wegmans or Whole Foods. Still, discount shoppers have proven willing to accept the trade-offs. We compared prices and reached out to shopping experts to identify some of the best things to buy at Aldi based on cost, quality or both. We also identified some of the worst things to buy. Have a look.

1.  Buy Kitchen Staples

Heading to the supermarket for some basics, say a gallon of milk, a dozen Grade A eggs, a loaf of white bread and a jar of peanut butter? Strictly judging by the bottom line, you may want to give Aldi a shot.

We priced out these four kitchen staples at an Aldi in Northern Virginia, and then compared the everyday, non-sale prices to similarly packaged store brands at three other nearby grocery retailers: Giant, Harris Teeter and Target. Here are the results (from cheapest to most expensive):

Eggs: Aldi, 39 cents; Harris Teeter, $1.39; Target, $1.49; Giant, $1.99
Bread: Aldi, 85 cents; Harris Teeter, 97 cents; Giant, 99 cents; Target, $1.64
Peanut butter: Aldi, $1.49; Target, $1.79; Giant, $2.19; Harris Teeter, $2.29
Milk: Aldi, $1.49; Target, $2.98; Giant, $3.49; Harris Teeter, $3.59

2.  Don’t Buy Fruits and Vegetables*

Like most of Aldi’s goods, fruits and vegetables are typically sold from the bulk boxes they were shipped in. No fancy, bountiful horn-of-plenty displays. And unlike major chains, the bulk of Aldi’s stores don’t refrigerate produce. While I’ve found Aldi’s fruits and vegetables generally top notch, others disagree.

“Produce [from Aldi] can spoil more quickly,” says Tracie Fobes, a money-saving expert at the website Pennypinchinmom.com, “so buy only what you can eat within a few days.”

Also, Aldi pre-packages many of its fruits and vegetables in bulk, so if you want, say, an apple you need to buy an entire bag. Most big supermarket chains sell similar produce loose. The latter approach allows shoppers to pick out the freshest individual items available.

* This advice applies to most of Aldi’s older existing stores. New (and newly renovated) stores are another story…

3.  But Do Buy Fruits and Vegetables at New Aldi Stores

Aldi is rolling out changes aimed at fending off competitors including Whole Foods’ offshoot discount chain, 365 by Whole Foods. On top of better lighting and wider aisles, Aldi’s new store format puts fresh produce center stage and includes refrigerated units for the likes of greens, perishable fruits and (shocker!) premade soups and dips. Bulk packaging still rules at new stores, but that’s a big reason why Aldi can keep produce prices so low.

If you’re produce shopping at an Aldi store that hasn’t adopted this new format – which means most of them – there are workarounds.

“Aldi’s fruit and vegetables are usually the lowest price compared to other grocers, and they rate as good quality, especially if you shop early mornings when stock is full to choose from,” says Brent Shelton of money-saving site FatWallet.com. “A good tip to improve shelf life is to make sure you wash any produce as soon as you get home.”

4.  Buy Aldi’s Name-Brand Knockoffs

You won’t find many name brands at Aldi. About 90% of the items it stocks are private-label products wedged into a mere 15,000 square feet of space (about one third the size of a standard supermarket).

Yet, as you walk Aldi’s aisles, a lot of the packaging will seem familiar even if the brands aren’t. That’s not by accident.

“A good majority of Aldi’s private-label products are actually name-brand products, just repackaged,” says FatWallet’s Shelton, “so quality is high, and price is usually lower than the brands available at regular grocers.”

Fobes of Pennypinchinmom.com says quality is especially high in Aldi’s canned goods, pasta, condiments and almond milk, which is “smooth and creamy, but more affordable.”

5.  Buy European Novelty Foods and Drinks

Aldi wears its German roots proudly. Look no further than the strudel in the freezer case for proof. You’ll find German and other European chocolates on store shelves, too. According to Fobes, specialty chocolates, in general, are among the best things to buy at Aldi because they are “smooth and creamy at a much lower cost than most other stores.”

Aldi loyalists also rave about the inexpensive, and interesting, selections of wines and beers, as well as the selections of Italian and French sodas and lemonades. Look for packaged gourmet cheese, too.

Prowl the aisles to find more European products that aren’t carried by other U.S. grocers. Keep checking back, since Aldi tends to rotate stock at a high rate. Many products are here today, gone tomorrow.

6.  Buy Organic and Gluten-Free Products

Aldi has been stepping up its game with organic and gluten-free products, especially as it escalates its war on Whole Foods with the redesigned stores.

“They have a huge variety [of organic and gluten-free products],” says Fobes, “which is much less expensive than the name brands.”

And if, from a health perspective, you’re concerned about the quality of Aldi’s private-label foods, there’s been a major change over the past year.

Aldi has removed from the majority of its private-label goods such healthy eating no-nos as partially hydrogenated oils and MSG, says Shelton. The company has also removed growth hormones from its dairy products and carries a line of packaged meats labeled “Never Any!” that is free of added antibiotics, hormones and animal by-products.

7.  Don’t Buy Anything You Can’t Eat or Drink

Savings experts say it’s best to steer clear of most toys, home goods, cleaning supplies and other non-food items at Aldi. But if you’re tempted – every so often, Aldi will score national-brand products and put what appears to be amazing prices on them – first pull out your smartphone and price-compare.

“Make sure you check the price on these as they tend to be higher prices on lower quality items at Aldi,” says Shelton. “Plus, you can often find coupons for these types of items at other stores, even grocers, which would make buying them elsewhere a smart thing to do.” Aldi doesn’t accept coupons.

When we compared prices on a roll of paper towels, for example, Aldi’s price of 99 cents was the same as the price at Giant and Target. However, coupons and loyalty discounts could’ve brought down the price more at the latter retailers. (Aldi doesn’t have a loyalty program, either.)

“Paper products are not always less expensive [at Aldi],” agrees Fobes. “You may find a better deal and quality at the big-box stores.”


Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

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10 Reasons You Will Never Make $1 Million Dollars

Here is a nice article provided by Stacy Rapacon of Kiplinger:


Wealthy people usually aren't born that way. Most spend their lives amassing their fortunes by working hard, spending little, saving a lot and investing wisely. It may sound like a simple strategy, but the fact that the vast majority of Americans fall short of millionaire status proves that it's easier said than done.

Then again, 10.4 million households in the U.S. have $1 million or more in investable assets, according to market research and consulting firm Spectrem Group, and their ranks are growing. So it's not impossible.

Read on to learn what you might be doing to keep yourself out of the millionaire's club. More importantly, find out how you can change your ways and build your own seven-figure nest egg.

1.  You Picked the Wrong Profession

Accumulating wealth starts with your first paycheck, and some jobs can get you going faster than others. According to consulting firm Capgemini's World Wealth Report, many wealthy people today work in technology, finance and medicine—fields that are well represented in our list of the best jobs for the future. Positions in these areas have generous salaries and are in high demand. For example, among our top jobs is nurse practitioner, which has a median salary of more than $97,000 a year. In contrast, a door-to-door sales worker, among our worst jobs for the future, can expect to make about $20,700 a year. Of course, given enough time and the right saving and spending habits, you can build a fortune even with a small salary. But a higher income can certainly make it easier to save more, faster.

What you can do about it

If you're still in school, majoring in a promising field can put you on the path to a lucrative career and help make you a millionaire. But remember: You'll have an easier time working hard for the rest of your life if you have a legitimate interest in your chosen profession.

If you're past your college days, you can still learn some skills to advance your career and increase your earning potential with free online courses.

2.  You Fear the Stock Market

Cash stuffed under your mattress or even deposited in a savings account won't keep up with inflation, much less grow into $1 million. In order to maximize your gains, you need to invest your money wisely. In many cases, that means putting your money mostly in stocks.

Consider the math: According to Bankrate.com, the highest yield you can expect from a money market account right now is 1.26%. If you put away $10,000 in one and added nothing else, in 10 years, with monthly compounding, you'd have about $11,340 total. But if you invested that $10,000 and earned a 6% return, you'd have almost $18,200, or $6,860 more.

What you can do about it

There's no denying that the stock market can take you on a bumpy ride, so your fears are understandable. But steeling yourself and diving in is well worth it. Over the long term, stocks have marched upward and proved to be the investment of choice for expanding wealth.

Savings earmarked for retirement are particularly well suited for the stock market. With a long time horizon, you have time to recover from market dips.

3.  You Don’t Save Enough

If you don't save money, you're never going to be rich. It's hard to get around that obvious (but often ignored) principle. Even if you earn seven figures, if you spend it all, you still net zero.

What you can do about it

Begin saving as soon as possible. The sooner you start putting your money to work, the less you actually have to save. If you start saving at age 35, you'll need to put away $671 each month in order to reach $1 million by the time you turn 65, assuming you earn an 8% annual return. If you wait until you're 45 years old to start saving, you'll have to save $1,698 a month to hit $1 million in 20 years.

How can you start saving? First, you need a budget (more on budgeting later). Lay out all of your expenses to see where your money is going. Then, you can figure out where you can trim costs and save. Any little bit you can muster is a good start. And whenever you get a bonus or some extra cash—for example, after selling some belongings or getting a generous birthday gift—add it to your savings before you have time to think of ways you can spend it.

4.  You Live Beyond Your Means

Spending more than you earn can put you in a dangerous hole of debt. On the bright side, you won't be in there alone: According to the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, one in three American households carries credit card debt from month to month. And among those balance-carrying households, the average credit-card debt is $16,048, according to financial research firm ValuePenguin.

What you can do about it

Again, you need to have a budget to make sure you have more money coming in than going out. With the availability of credit, it's easy to fall into thinking you can afford more than you actually can. But, as Knight Kiplinger has pointed out, "the biggest barrier to becoming rich is living like you're rich before you are."

Even once you are rich, you may still want to live like you're not. According to U.S. Trust's Insights on Wealth and Worth survey, the majority of millionaires don't actually consider themselves "wealthy." If you don't think of yourself as well off, and you maintain the same lifestyle after your income and savings increase, you can put away even more for your short- and long-term goals without losing an ounce of comfort.

5.  You overlook the value of nickels and dimes

No, we're not suggesting that you search for loose change under your sofa cushions. Rather, cutting seemingly insignificant expenses—such as baggage charges on your flights, late-payment penalties on your bills and out-of-network ATM fees on your cash withdrawals—can add up to substantial savings.

Investing fees attached to mutual funds and 401(k) plans can be especially detrimental. For example, let's assume you currently have $25,000 saved in your 401(k) and earn 7% a year, on average. If you pay fees and expenses of 0.5% a year, your account would grow to $227,000 after 35 years. But increasing the extra charges to 1.5% annually would mean your account would grow to just $163,000 over that time.

What you can do about it

More than you realize. Pay attention to the fine print, and avoid those sneaky extra charges. You can skip airline baggage fees by packing lightly and bringing only a carry-on or by flying Southwest Airlines, which allows you to check two bags free. If you make a late payment on a credit card, ask the issuer to waive the fee. Long-time customers who usually pay on time are often given a pass. For more, see How to Avoid Paying 21 Annoying Fees.

For your 401(k), you can see how it rates with other plans at www.brightscope.com. You can select low-cost mutual funds to lower your investing costs. (Check out the Kiplinger 25, a list of our favorite no-load funds.) Also consider talking to your employer about the possibility of lowering the plan's fees.

6.  You are drowning in debt

Again, debt can be a danger to your financial well-being. If you're constantly paying credit card bills and racking up interest, you won't have a chance to save any money.

But not all debt is bad. Borrowing to go to school, to get professional training or to start your own business can help boost your career and income potential. Especially in a low-interest-rate environment, the investment can be well worth it. In fact, borrowing funds is one of the most preferred funding strategies used by high-net-worth individuals with 60% opting to use bank credit before tapping their own holdings for quick cash, according to U.S. Trust.

What you can do about it

If you already have some debt troubles, be sure to devise a repayment plan. One strategy is to pay off the debt with the highest interest rate first. The sooner you clear that away, the more you save on interest. Another strategy is to pay off the smallest debt first to give yourself a psychological boost and encourage you to keep chipping away.

If you're considering taking out new loans—to go back to school or seed your business, for example—make sure you understand all the terms, including your interest rate and repayment details, so you can decide whether it's truly worth it.

7.  You neglect your health

You need to work to make money, and you need to be healthy in order to work. The rich understand that, and 98% of millionaires consider good health to be their most important personal asset, according to U.S. Trust.

What you can do about it

Take care of yourself—and do it on the cheap. You can take advantage of free wellness programs offered by your employer, as well as free preventive-care services guaranteed by federal law, such as blood pressure screenings, mammograms for women older than 40 and routine vaccinations for children. Also try to quit any bad health habits, such as smoking or excessive drinking, that can cost you dearly.

8.  You don't have a budget

Without a budget, it's easy to lose track of how much you're spending and live beyond your means. Working toward financial goals, such as saving for a vacation, buying a house or funding your retirement, can also prove difficult if you don't have a well-thought-out plan.

What you can do about it

Do what the majority of millionaires do: Establish a budget. Knowing where your money is going helps you identify ways to keep more in your pocket. Break out the pencil, paper and calculator to lay out your income and expenses.

Or go digital with your finances by using a budgeting Web site such as Mint or BudgetPulse to help you track your spending. With Mint, you provide your usernames and passwords for bank accounts, credit cards and other financial accounts, and the site organizes your money movement for you. Your bank or credit card issuer might offer similar tools to help you analyze your spending habits.

9.  You pay too much in taxes

Did you get a tax refund this year? Receiving that lump-sum payment from Uncle Sam may seem like a good thing. But it actually means that you've loaned the government money without earning any interest.

What you can do about it

Adjust your tax withholding. You can use our tax-withholding calculator to see how much you can fatten your paycheck by doing so. If you got a $3,000 refund (about average for 2015), claiming an additional three allowances on your Form W-4 can boost your monthly take-home pay by $250. The extra money, which can be invested in stocks or deposited in an interest-bearing account, should start showing up in your next paycheck.

Such a sum may not lend itself to millionaire status on its own, but being mindful of taxes is important to increasing—and keeping—your wealth. Indeed, 55% of high-net-worth investors prioritize minimizing taxes when it comes to investment decisions. A couple of smart tax-planning strategies you should consider: picking the right tax-deferred retirement savings accounts and holding investments long enough to qualify for the lower, long-term capital gains tax. Even choosing the right state to live in can have a big impact on your finances when it comes to taxes.

10.  You lack purpose in your life

There's more to life than money, and wealthy people know it. According to U.S. Trust, 94% of millionaires say they have a clear sense of purpose in their lives. "Whatever that purpose or direction happens to be—whether it's their family, their family legacy, philanthropy or stewardship of a business—[knowing their purpose means] they have the emotional maturity to focus on it and make decisions in the context of what's most important to them," says Paul Stavig, managing director and wealth strategist of U.S. Trust.

What you can do about it

Entire religions and philosophies are dedicated to helping people figure out what they're meant to do in this life. We won't try to compete. But we will note that a clear purpose can help motivate you to make and save more. Indeed, 76% of millionaires recognize that money can give you the opportunity to create change and fulfill your life's purpose.


Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

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12 Reasons You Will Go Broke in Retirement

Here is a nice article provided by Stacy Rapacon of Kiplinger:

 

Retirement is a major milestone that brings many life changes. One thing that doesn't change for most people: the fear of running out of money. According to the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, the most frequently reported retirement worry is outliving savings and investments. Across all ages, 51% of respondents cited this concern, and 41% of retirees claim the same fear. Additionally, only 46% of retirees think they've built a nest egg large enough to last through retirement.

Now is the time to face your fears. Take a look at a dozen ways you could go broke in retirement and learn how to avoid them. Some you can avert with careful planning; others you have little control over. But you can prepare your finances to make the best of whatever may come.

1.  You Abandon Stocks:

It's true that stocks can be risky. For example, so far in 2016, Standard & Poor's 500-stock index, a benchmark for many investors, has experienced several wild swings, opening with a 5% decline in January and including a headline-grabbing, single-day drop of 3.4% on June 24 in response to the Brexit. So once you're retired, you might be inclined to move your money out of stocks altogether and instead focus on preserving your wealth.

But that would be a mistake. Despite the volatility, the S&P 500 is up about 6% year-to-date, as of mid October 2016. Without stocks, "you don't get the growth that you need," says Carrie Schwab-Pomerantz, senior vice president at Charles Schwab and author of The Charles Schwab Guide to Finances After Fifty. "You need your money to continue to grow through those 20 to 30 years of retirement." She recommends maintaining a stock allocation of at least 20% during retirement for your portfolio to outpace inflation and help maintain your lifestyle.

2.  You invest too much in stocks:

On the other hand, you're right: Stocks are risky. "You don't want to have too much in stocks, especially if you're so reliant on that portfolio, because of the volatility of the market," says Schwab-Pomerantz. There's no one-size-fits-all formula, but for the average investor Schwab-Pomerantz recommends moving to 60% stocks as you approach retirement, then trimming back to 40% stocks in early retirement. Later in retirement, allocate 20% to stocks.

If you're hesitant to make these portfolio adjustments yourself and don't want to work with a financial adviser, consider investing in target-date mutual funds instead. These funds are designed to reduce exposure to stocks gradually over time as you approach (and surpass) your target date for retirement. Not all target-date funds are the same, even if they sport the same retirement target year in their names. Be aware of specific funds' expenses and asset-allocation strategies to ensure they are affordable and fit your needs.

3.  You Live Too Long:

More time to enjoy the life you love is a joy; trying to afford it can be a pain. Current retirees are expecting a long retirement—a median of 28 years, according to the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. And 41% of retirees expect their retirements to go on for more than three decades. Women have to plan for an even longer life. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a man who was age 65 in 2014 can expect to live to age 83, on average, while a woman of the same age may reach 85.5 years.

When saving for retirement, plan for a long life. But if it starts to look like your nest egg will come up short, you have to adjust your budget. For example, it might behoove you to downsize your home or relocate to an area with low taxes and living costs. You may even consider finding ways to pull in extra income, such as starting an encore career, taking a part-time job or cashing in on the sharing economy, if you can.

4.  You Spend Too Much:

It might seem obvious, but most of us—retired or not—are guilty of making this mistake and could benefit from a reminder to quit it. In fact, according to the Employee Benefit Research Institute, nearly 46% of retired households spent more annually in their first two years of retirement than they did just before retiring.

And retirees on a fixed income are particularly vulnerable to the ill effects of committing this error. "One of the biggest mistakes, I think, is that people continue to spend the way they did in their earning years without taking a close look at their current income," says Schwab-Pomerantz. "For retirees, budgeting is more important than ever." (Use Kiplinger's Household Budgeting Worksheet to get your expenses under control.)

5.  You rely on a single source of income:

Multiple income streams are better than one, especially in retirement. Case in point: Social Security is the primary source of income for 61% of retirees, according to the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. And 44% of retirees report that one of their biggest financial fears is that Social Security will be reduced or cease to exist in the future. Based on current projections, Social Security will only be able to pay 77% of promised retirement benefits beginning in 2035.

A pension, which 42% of retirees use as a source of income, or inheritance likely can't stand alone to support you through retirement, either. But when you put them all together, along with your self-funded retirement accounts—such as 401(k)s and IRAs—then you have a more stable and diversified financial base to rely on throughout your retirement.

6.  You can't work:

Another good reason for needing plenty of savings and multiple streams of income to support you in retirement: You can't count on being able to bring in a paycheck if you need it. While 51% of workers expect to continue working some in retirement, only 6% of retirees report working in retirement as a source of income.

Whether you work is not always up to you. In fact, 60% of retirees left the workforce earlier than planned, according to the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Of those, 66% did so because of employment-related issues, including organizational changes at their companies, losing their jobs and taking buyouts. Health-related issues—either their own ill health or that of a loved one—was cited by 37%. Just 16% retired early because they felt they could afford to.

7.  You get sick:

As you age, your health is bound to deteriorate, and getting the proper care is expensive. According to a 2015 report from the Employee Benefit Research Institute, a 65-year-old man would need to save $68,000 to have a 50% chance of affording his health-care expenses in retirement (excluding long-term care) that aren't covered by Medicare or private insurance. To have a 90% chance, the same man would need to save $124,000. The news is worse for a 65-year-old woman, who would need to save $89,000 and $140,000, respectively. Be sure you're doing all you can to cut health-care costs in retirement by considering supplemental medigap and Medicare Advantage plans and reviewing your options every year.

Long-term care bumps up the bill even more. For example, the median cost for adult day health care in the U.S. is $1,473 a month; for a private room in a nursing home, it costs a median of $7,698 a month, according to Genworth. No wonder 44% of retirees fear declining health that requires long-term care and 31% fear cognitive decline, dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Consider getting long-term-care insurance to help cover those costs, and use these tactics to make it affordable.

8.  You tap the wrong retirement accounts:

This mistake probably won't leave you flat broke, but lacking a smart withdrawal strategy can cost you. The most tax-efficient way to go, suggests Schwab-Pomerantz, is to draw down the principal from your maturing bonds and certificates of deposit first, since they are no longer bearing interest. Next, if you're 70½ or older, take your required minimum distributions from your traditional tax-deferred accounts, such as IRAs and 401(k)s, focusing on assets that are overweighted or no longer appropriate for your portfolio. You face a stiff penalty from the IRS for neglecting to take RMDs on time.

Then, sell from your taxable accounts, for which you only have to pay the capital-gains tax. (Note: Retirees in the two lowest income tax brackets pay no tax at all on their capital gains.) Finally, withdraw from your tax-deferred and Roth accounts, in that order.

9.  You don't consider taxes:

Needing to be tax-smart extends beyond your drawdown strategy (see #8). Where you live impacts what you pay in taxes big time. That's part of why so many people flock to Florida and Arizona after they retire. Along with the warm weather and ample sunshine, those states offer two of the country's ten most tax-friendly environments for retirees. Other states with retirement-friendly tax codes include Alaska, Georgia and Nevada.

Of course, taxes alone shouldn't dictate where you live in retirement. Friends, family and other community ties play a major role. But you have to keep state and local taxes in mind (especially sales taxes, property taxes and taxes on retirement income) when planning your budget. Take a look at our state-by-state guide to taxes on retirees for more.

10.  You bankroll the kids:

A mistake made out of love is a mistake all the same. You may feel obligated to assist your children financially—paying for college, contributing to the down payment for a first home and covering them in emergencies, for example. But doing so at the expense of your retirement security may cause bigger problems for both you and your kids in the long run.

"It sounds awful to think a parent won't help [his children], but you're only going to become a drag on your kids eventually if you don't really focus on your own financial security during those later years," says Schwab-Pomerantz. "You gotta take care of yourself first."

11.  You are underinsured:

Cutting costs in retirement is important, but scrimping on insurance might not be the best place to do it. Adequate health coverage, in particular, is essential to prevent a devastating illness or injury from wiping out your nest egg. Medicare Part A, which covers hospital services, is a good start. It’s free to most retirees. But you’ll need to pay extra for Part B (doctor visits and outpatient services) and Part D (prescription drugs). Even then, you’ll probably want a supplemental medigap policy to help cover deductibles, copayments and such. "Medicare is very complex, and it's more expensive than people realize," says Schwab-Pomerantz. "So it definitely needs to be part of the budgeting process."

And don't forget about other forms of insurance. As you age, your chances of having accidents both at home and on the road increase. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an average of 586 adults who are 65 and older are injured every day in car crashes. Beyond your own medical expenses, all it can take is a single adverse ruling in an accident-related lawsuit to drain your retirement savings. Review the liability coverage that you already have through your auto and home policies. If it’s not sufficient, either bump up the limits or invest in a separate umbrella liability policy that will kick in once your primary insurance maxes out. Premiums on a $1 million umbrella policy might run about $300 a year.

12.  You get scammed:

Older adults are particularly vulnerable to scam artists and fraudsters. The FBI notes that seniors are prime targets for such criminals because of their presumed wealth, relatively trusting nature and typical unwillingness to report these crimes. Even worse, the perpetrators may be closer than you think. According to a study from MetLife and the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse, an estimated one million elders lose $2.6 billion a year due to financial abuse—and family members and caregivers are the perpetrators 55% of the time.

Some common scams to watch out for: Con artists may pretend to represent Medicare to collect your personal information. Cheap prescription drugs marketed online could be knock-offs, and you may be handing over your credit card information in exchange for endangering your health. Charity workers seeking donations for disaster aid might actually pocket the money for themselves. See our advice on how to protect yourself from fraudsters.


Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

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15 Things You Should Never Buy During the Holidays

Here is a nice article provided by Bob Niedt of Kiplinger:


The season of giving is also the season of getting. You're likely spending lots of money purchasing gifts for friends and loved ones during the holidays. But proceed with caution: There are a number of things you shouldn't be buying between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Why? Because certain items tend to be considerably less expensive outside the peak holiday shopping season.

We reached out to deal experts to give us the particulars on what not to buy during the holidays. Here are 15 things they say you will be better off purchasing at other times of the year.

1.  Cars

Forget the notion of waking up on Christmas morning to find a new car in the driveway. Instead, think New Year's Eve (during business hours, of course) to get the best deal on a new vehicle. Car dealers are in the mood to haggle and clear their inventory before year's end to make room for new models and earn manufacturer incentives.

Looking for a used car? Hold off until April for the best deals. It's the month dealers tend to buy the most at auction, giving you the best selection.

2.  Exercise Equipment

You might see a few sales on fitness gear and apparel in late November and December, but January is when the real deals appear on exercise equipment, according to Benjamin Glaser of DealNews.com.

Hey, we've all done it and retailers know it: We resolve to lose weight and get fit in the New Year. To that end, those retailers have sales on fitness equipment in January. Look for markdowns of 30% to 70% on fitness DVDs, treadmills, elliptical trainers, stationary bikes and complete home gyms.

3.  Caribbean Cruises

Cruising during the holidays can often mean more crowds and higher fares, says Colleen McDaniel, managing editor of Cruise Critic. By booking a cruise for January, February or March, you can take advantage of lower fares, avoid the holiday crowds and beat the spring break rush. The industry's "wave season" also takes place during that time, when cruise lines offer added discounts that may help you save even more on your trip, she says. You can score some of the best cruise deals if you book at the last minute -- just don't expect the really cheap tickets to get you a stateroom with a view.

4.  Bedding

If you're considering stocking up on bedding during the holidays -- we're talking everything from comforters to sheets and pillow cases -- wait a few weeks longer for even deeper discounts, according to the deals website BensBargains.com. Take advantage of "white sales" in January at big-name retailers including Macy's, Target and Kohl's. Savings on bedding during these annual sales can add up to as much as 50%.

5.  Broadway Tickets

You can get two tickets for the price of one to several popular shows during Broadway Week (which is actually two weeks). In 2017, it runs from January 17 to February 5. The twofer tickets go on sale January 5. Some shows might even offer the discount for up to four weeks, according to one Broadway insider we spoke with.


In general, January and February are good months to see Broadway shows. It's off-season and the dead of winter, so ticket prices tend to drop. Avoid the crush between Christmas and New Year's.

6.  Furniture

If you need to spruce up the living or dining room before guests arrive for the holidays, don't expect to find a good deal on a sofa or table and chairs before Christmas. Instead, wait until after Christmas, when furniture stores hold clearance sales to make room for new styles that are usually released in February. For example, furniture retailer Room & Board has an in-store and online clearance sale once a year, typically the day after Christmas. Expect discounts of up to 50% on discontinued furniture styles and in-store floor samples.

Also, many stores offer 0% financing along with the big discounts during annual clearance sales. Put this note on your 2017 calendar: Because new styles often are released in August, too, July is another good month to look for deals on furniture.

7.  Gift Cards

Gift cards are a no-brainer when you're stumped for ideas. However, if you can hold off until after the holiday shopping frenzy has died down to purchase gift cards, you could save yourself some money.

Here's the scoop from deals experts: Some people who receive unwanted gift cards for the holiday turn around and sell them for cash online. Web sites such as CardCash.com and Cardpool.com buy the gift cards at a steep discount and re-sell them below face value. Since sites typically get flooded with gift cards right after the holidays, the average card price is driven down due to the increased inventory. Also on eBay right after the holidays, gift cards can sell for up to 15% cheaper than the original price.

8.  Winter Sports Gear

Hold off on gifts for winter sports enthusiasts until the New Year. Snowboards, skis, ice skates, goggles, hockey gear and more will be marked down at least 10% to 20% in January, according to DealNews. If you can wait a bit longer, expect even deeper discounts during clearance sales in February and March when the winter sports season winds down.

9.  Jewelry

A new piece of jewelry ranks high on many holiday wish lists. But high demand often means higher prices, so you may want to give your sweetheart a rain check and wait until after Valentine's Day to buy that pearl necklace or those diamond earrings. You can save 15% to 25% on jewelry during post-Valentine's Day sales, says Howard Schaffer of deal site Offers.com.

10.  Luggage

If you need to replace a beat-up roll-on that's been tossed around too many times by airline baggage handlers, March is the best time to buy luggage. Retailers mark down luggage because sales have slowed after the busy holiday travel season and haven't picked up yet for summer travel, according to Deals2Buy.com, a deals and coupons website. Look for discounts ranging from 20% to 70%.

11.  Mattresses

You probably don't expect Santa to shove a mattress down your chimney. But if you were thinking about giving your holiday guests something more comfortable than a futon to sleep on, you might want to reconsider buying a mattress during November or December. You'll save as much as 70% by waiting until Memorial Day sales in May to buy a mattress. In the meantime, promise your guests a plush mattress next year and hope they don't mind sleeping on the couch this year.

12.  Perfume

Perfume sales often peak around Christmas and Valentine's Day. So retailers tend to discount perfume heavily after these holidays have passed. FreeShipping.org founder Luke Knowles says consumers can expect prices on perfume to be slashed by as much as 50% in late February and March, with the best sales at websites dedicated to perfume.

13.  Tools

Tools typically are discounted during Black Friday sales. But wait to buy a new drill, wrench set or tool chest around Father's Day instead. You'll save 5% to 15% more on tools in June when retailers have sales on gifts for dads, says Offers.com's Schaffer.

14.  Winter Apparel

Retailers will offer discounts on coats, sweaters and other cold-weather clothing during Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales. However, the deals will be even better in January when stores have clearance sales on winter apparel to make room for spring clothing. You can expect to see markdowns of at least 75%.

15.  Holiday Decorations

Resist the urge to buy new holiday decorations before Christmas because you can get them at bottom-of-the-barrel prices in January, according to Glaser of DealNews.com. Retailers typically mark down ornaments, garlands, artificial trees and décor as much as 90% after December 25. If you don't mind the red-and-green theme or chocolates shaped like a wreath, you can also load up on deeply discounted edible holiday treats in January. Buy durable decorations that will last in storage until next year, says Glaser.


Robert J. Pyle, CFP®, CFA is president of Diversified Asset Management, Inc. (DAMI). DAMI is licensed as an investment adviser with the State of Colorado Division of Securities, and its investment advisory representatives are licensed by the State of Colorado. DAMI will only transact business in other states to the extent DAMI has made the requisite notice filings or obtained the necessary licensing in such state. No follow up or individualized responses to persons in other jurisdictions that involve either rendering or attempting to render personalized investment advice for compensation will be made absent compliance with applicable legal requirements, or an applicable exemption or exclusion. It does not constitute investment or tax advice. To contact Robert, call 303-440-2906 or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

The views, opinion, information and content provided here are solely those of the respective authors, and may not represent the views or opinions of Diversified Asset Management, Inc.  The selection of any posts or articles should not be regarded as an explicit or implicit endorsement or recommendation of any such posts or articles, or services provided or referenced and statements made by the authors of such posts or articles.  Diversified Asset Management, Inc. cannot guarantee the accuracy or currency of any such third party information or content, and does not undertake to verify or update such information or content. Any such information or other content should not be construed as investment, legal, accounting or tax advice.

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